Travel

Exploring Prosecco Road

With so many vineyards dotted throughout Prosecco Road, it can be hard to choose where to go. These are my favorites and all worth a visit!

With so many vineyards dotted throughout Prosecco Road, it can be hard to choose where to go. These are my favorites and all worth a visit!

Everything here is my own opinion and I received no compensation for this post. It also contains affiliate links. If you have any questions about this, just click here! All images copyright Teaspoon of Nose.


A quick note about coronavirus and my travel content: in these unprecedented times, I know much of the world isn’t traveling right now. But my hope is that you keep dreaming and planning for travel, and when the time comes, you go! In that spirit, I’ll continue sharing travel tips for when it’s safe for global travel.

There are hundreds of vineyards tucked into the Strada del Prosecco, or Prosecco road. Like the Napa Valley, you can find anything from tiny family operations to massive businesses that export worldwide. Today, I’m sharing a few favorites you can see in a day!

Prosecco Road covers the roughly 20 miles between the towns of Conegliano and Valdobbiadene. I’ve certainly not visited all or even most of the vineyards here, these are the early favorites!

With so many vineyards dotted throughout Prosecco Road, it can be hard to choose where to go. These are my favorites and all worth a visit!

San Gregorio

Let’s start with the best, shall we? Tucked into the southwest corner of Valdobbiadene, San Gregorio definitely my favorite winery in terms of quality AND people. Family-owned, the winery is staffed by five sisters and their parents.

You can do a tasting of their various types of prosecco and a snack for around 8€ per person, which includes an explanation of their process, what separates the different types, and even a tasting of their limited run best one. And when I say tastes, I mean you receive multiple half glasses. These are not your American winery one-ounce pours.

Don’t miss trying the prosecco tranquillo – an unusual offering with just the tiniest hint of bubbles. It reminds me of a vinho verde, tasting almost-but-not-quite carbonated.

If you do a tasting, one of the sisters will walk you through them – having met several of them, they’re all funny and kind and share their expertise without talking down to you if you know nothing about wine. Let me put it this way: the day we visited, all the English speaking sisters had left for a festival (targeting Americans), and Lucia managed to explain the process in a way that my mediocre Italian could translate to the group and still teach us a lot!

Hands down, San Gregorio is my favorite winery. My suggestion is to head here first and work your way back: best to start with the best!

Prosecco Vending Machine

With so many vineyards dotted throughout Prosecco Road, it can be hard to choose where to go. These are my favorites and all worth a visit!

I’ve shared about this one before, and its worth a visit! Novelty alone wins major points. Again, look at the labels for a DOC or DOCG option, and if you’re with a larger group, you may need to come in the early afternoon to get a good spot. But it is lovely and worth a visit! Grab all the details here.

My only word of caution here is that you can get better prosecco for cheaper at one of the many surrounding wineries. But I’m all for the experience of getting wine from a vending machine, so go check it out and pick a bottle!

Ca’ Salina

With so many vineyards dotted throughout Prosecco Road, it can be hard to choose where to go. These are my favorites and all worth a visit!

This spot is located less than 100 yards from the vending machine hill, so it’s an easy follow up. Ca’ Salina is family run – every time I’ve been, the patriarch Gregorio is behind the counter serving customers. While I don’t know the details, he comes from the prestigious (in the prosecco world) Bortolini family, who apparently split in the ’50s to open their own styles of wineries.

With a quiet demeanor, he asks questions of what we like before making a recommendation. They’re also one of the few vineyards I’ve found that offer sparkling rosé – it’s a bit sweet but refreshing rather than cloying. While they do offer tastings, we’ve always bought a bottle or two to sip on their front patio. Bonus: they are fine with you buying a bottle and taking their lovely glasses over to the vending machine hill to enjoy, so long as you bring back the glasses!

Gallina Sergio Vineyards

With so many vineyards dotted throughout Prosecco Road, it can be hard to choose where to go. These are my favorites and all worth a visit!

This might be my favorite spot to wrap up a day exploring Prosecco Road. It’s the smallest outfit on the list, literally a window built into the side of the owner’s home with picnic tables scattered on the edge of the vineyards.

The Gallina family has been cultivating grapes for over 150 years and the winery offer several DOCG proseccos, each with an adorable animal line drawing on the label. They don’t do tastings – again, this place is so excellently local that they don’t really bother with that – but you can buy a bottle and sit overlooking the fields. The best one is the Piccio Giallo, with a bird on the label – it’s their most expensive, but still crazy reasonable for a bottle of highly accredited wine.

Planning Your Trip To Prosecco Road

With so many vineyards dotted throughout Prosecco Road, it can be hard to choose where to go. These are my favorites and all worth a visit!

When you plan your trip, here are a few things to note:

  • When in doubt, look for the designation of DOC or DOCG. Both are signals of excellent quality (DOCG is better, but DOC is also great) and have to do with both the specific geography of the vineyard and method of production.
  • If you’re visiting in late August or early September, you may want to call ahead – sometimes they close their tasting rooms to focus on the harvest!
  • Give yourself plenty of time to get there. While a map shows Prosecco Road as only about 20 miles from Aviano AB, it takes roughly an hour to get to the closest edge. The roads are beautiful and windy, but that means you make slow progress.
  • Italians are generous with their tastings, so make sure you’ve got a designated driver sorted! The combination of windy roads and an Italian legal alcohol limit of BAC 0.05 means you don’t want to play that one by ear.
  • Many of the vineyards require reservations for tastings if your group gets bigger than four. Alternately, you can just purchase a bottle and enjoy it from their picturesque patio (there’s always a picturesque patio, trust me) without a reservation.
With so many vineyards dotted throughout Prosecco Road, it can be hard to choose where to go. These are my favorites and all worth a visit!
With so many vineyards dotted throughout Prosecco Road, it can be hard to choose where to go. These are my favorites and all worth a visit!
With so many vineyards dotted throughout Prosecco Road, it can be hard to choose where to go. These are my favorites and all worth a visit!

I hope these get you started on your day in Prosecco Road! Depending on your speed, you can see all of these in an afternoon, but I recommend moving slowly, soaking in the incredible views and every drop of delicious Prosecco!

Would you be interested in more in-depth reviews of vineyards? Message me to let me know if so!

Join my mailing list for members-only exclusive content!



Thoughts?

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.